Uniview: A grandiose journey through space and time

Tue Dec 27, 2022, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Wed Dec 28, 2022, 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Wed Dec 28, 2022, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Thu Dec 29, 2022, 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Thu Dec 29, 2022, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Fri Dec 30, 2022, 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Fri Dec 30, 2022, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Tue Jan 3, 2023, 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Tue Jan 3, 2023, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Wed Jan 4, 2023, 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Wed Jan 4, 2023, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Thu Jan 5, 2023, 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Thu Jan 5, 2023, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Fri Jan 6, 2023, 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Fri Jan 6, 2023, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Sat Mar 11, 2023, 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
All times are given in Central European Time (CET / UTC +1).
Deep Space 8K
DE
SAT, SUN, public holiday 11:30 AM, 2 PM (subject to change)
With your museum ticket you can experience "Uniview" at no extra charge!
"Uniview" is also always part of our daily "Deep Space Selection".

No visit to Deep Space 8K is complete without Uniview – the visualisation software enables interactive flights in 3D through the entire known and observable universe. In breathtaking images, the dimensions of space are experienced as never before, moon landings and walks on Saturn’s rings are possible in the blink of an eye and the universally known constellations can be viewed from completely new perspectives.

The model-like representation in the third dimension brings all the planets of our solar system as well as distant galaxies within reach. Additional information, such as the orbits of the celestial bodies or the Earth’s magnetic field, is made visible through spectacular visualisations. Distances do not matter, because you travel at billions of times the speed of light away from our solar system through the Milky Way, past other galaxies, to the theoretical end of the universe.

For the technical renewal of Deep Space 8K, Uniview also underwent an update: Version 3.0, developed by Zeiss, impresses with state-of-the-art 3D visualisations and invites you to exciting intergalactic destinations. Exploring Earth-like exoplanets is now just as possible as a trip to an imposing black hole, and even the James Webb Space Telescope can be visited. A special programme on Earth illustrates the complex mechanisms of our planet and the fine balance needed to make it habitable.

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